Devotional

Go and Sin No More

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John 8:3-11 (KJV)

What are our thoughts when we read this verse, words from the Lord Jesus Christ, Himself. Is this a suggestion for Godly living? Perhaps it’s a thought, which in reality is impossible because we are still warring with our old nature and prone to fall when faced with temptation. After all the Apostle Paul tells us he, the mighty giant of New Testament faith, struggled with conflicts in his own desires. Maybe it’s only situational, for surely the sin, the sin of immoral choice, is something anyone could avoid (John 8:10-11).

Or is it? Doesn’t scripture warn us to beware, for he who prides himself on standing, may suddenly find he has fallen (1 Corinthians 10:12)? How often do we continue to sin, excusing ourselves on the grounds that we are only human and God will surely understand? The question then arises – would God ask something of us that is impossible?

I was thinking of some of the excuses we use when faced with the difficult truths of scripture. We are faced with the reality of God’s holiness time and again. So far from what we find within ourselves, does He truly mean “Be holy as I am holy?” Peter makes frequent use of this word (1 Peter 1:15-16, 2:5 & 9). He makes it an “ought” in his second epistle, in answer to the question “What sort of people ought you to be?” He tells his readers, including you and me “You ought to live holy and Godly lives” (3:11).

Paul solves the problem of holiness for us. In many of his letters, to the Romans, to the Corinthians, and the Ephesians he illustrates by using the root of the tree being holy, therefore so are the branches; he refers to Timothy’s calling to a holy life and so forth. Writing to the Hebrews, he confirmed what he said earlier about holiness….he gives us hope. When Christ came into the world, it was with the express purpose of doing His Father’s will. “And by that will we have been made holy through the sacrifice of the body of Jesus Christ once for all!” (Hebrews 10:10).

The goal of a holy people (“holy nation” 1 Peter 2:9) is to “Make every effort to live in peace with all men and to be holy” (Hebrews 12:14). Now if I find I have failed to be holy, if temptation has overpowered me, I have recourse to the Father’s forgiveness, but without true repentance it’s useless to ask for it. True repentance expresses the attitude, intention, determination not to do it again. Whatever it takes, I am to flee the devil. I cannot continue to live in circumstances that bring this same temptation before me without placing some safeguards against it. Certainly blaming God for the way He made me will never hold water in the face of His holiness. If God’s word says it is wrong, then I have to examine what it tells me to do to protect myself. If a child has a murderous temper, the parents are obliged to curb it, to teach the little one to control that urge.

Reflection:

Do we think with shame and embarrassment how often we have failed by repeating the same sin?

When something is difficult is that an excuse for not trying?

Doesn’t this command “Go and sin no more” place the responsibility on us? Does God extend extra mercy and grace to help us?

by Marilyn Daniels (MarilynDaniels.net)

Devotional

Confession

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Psalm 51

What is the purpose of confession? Here’s the truth: God knows everything. He doesn’t need to be told what we have done, because He is aware. King David recognized this. “Before a word is on my tongue You know it completely!” (Psalm 139:4). The Psalm begins with a call to worship this Lord who knows every detail of our lives, perceiving our thoughts, familiar with all our ways!

Way back in time, God made clear a need for confession. Written in the Torah we read “If they confess their sins….their treachery against Me and their hostility toward Me…I will remember My covenant” (Leviticus 26:40, 42) Why is this necessary? Again we turn to David for an explanation. “Against You, You only have I sinned and done what is evil in Your sight” (Psalm 51:4). We may harm other people, but in doing so we are breaking God’s standard for holy living. Thus confession needs to be made to Him, while perhaps restitution needs to be made to those we have hurt.

Our confession is a recognition of the standard of God. In violating His perfect will, we need to remember the seriousness of our offense against a Holy God! Confession, if nothing else, is an act of humility. If that is genuine, we will be restored because God is faithful to His covenant. He has promised us eternal life, which begins at the moment we believe, and receive Jesus as Lord (John 1:12). Too many want Him as Saviour, but deny His Lordship by living their own way. Do we really want “Thy will be done”?

There is grave danger in using a “profession of faith” to get into heaven. That is not what the Christian life is all about. It is rejoicing in our salvation with such strength of purpose that life takes on a whole new meaning. We are indeed “…a new creation, the old has gone, the new has come” when we are “in” Christ” (2 Corinthians 5:17).

People in New Testament times, once they confessed their sins, were baptised. That is another act of faith, a demonstration to God and the world that we are serious about becoming children of God. Now we truly are one with the Father [united], depending on Him to guide and protect us (John 17:11). When we take control of our own lives, laying plans without consulting God’s wishes, we need to confess our waywardness.

Confession opens the door for cleansing. “If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to purify us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9). Of course there are those who deny they have any sin. This is a dangerous practice because it denies what God knows to be true. We often sin in our thoughts, or with feelings of anger, or fear, or hatred, resentment and the list goes on. Then there are those times when we do not do what the Holy Spirit is prodding us to do, called the sin of omission. If the truth about our personal sin is not something we are prepared to confess, then John says “His [God’s} Word has no place in our lives” (1 John 1:10). That is such a dangerous place to be!

Reflection:

What is it that prevents us from confessing to God? Do we deny we continue to sin, fearing if we do God will punish us? Have we presumed on God’s grace, believing He will overlook our sin because we are covered by the blood of Jesus? Do we look at sin casually – “it’s just a little white lie” mentality? The danger is if we are not obeying God’s Word. Satan takes hold of our weakness by inserting misunderstanding of what it means to relate to a Holy God! Our Father is also our judge…and a fair one, at that. However, we must not presume upon His mercy.

“It is written: As surely as I live, says the Lord, ’Every knee will bow before Me; every tongue will confess to God’. So then each of us will give an account of himself to God” (Romans 14:11-12).

by Marilyn Daniels (MarilynDaniels.net)

Uncategorized

Validate

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John 1:29-34

The crucifixion took place by people who vilified the “Lamb of God who came to take away the sins of the world” (John 1:29). Since His ascension into heaven, His sacrifice is validated by worship of “the Lamb who was slain”, by heavenly hosts gathered around God’s throne! (Revelation 5:9-10, 12).

Returning to His earthly experience, let us first note that the baby in the manger was announced by angels who proclaimed “Today, in the town of David, as Saviour has been born to you; He is Christ the Lord”. The shepherds then went into Bethlehem to check it out, and found Jesus lying in the hay (Luke 2:10-11, 16). At the very beginning of Jesus’ ministry John made the proclamation, just as we read, that the Lamb had come from God to remove the sin in their wicked world.

Of course we remember that prophecy was clearly fulfilled when the Magi appeared on the scene to worship the “King of the Jews” (Matthew 2:1-2). For Jews who knew their scripture, this was their ultimate hope and so we read that two elderly folk recognized Jesus as the child “destined to cause the falling and rising of man in Israel” through whom “the thoughts of many will be revealed” (Simeon – Matthew 2:34-35). Anna proclaimed to all who were gathered in the Temple that God had given this Child “to all who were looking forward to the redemption of Israel” (Matthew 2:38). And Mary treasured all these things, validating her precious son, in her heart!

After John baptised Jesus, a remarkable thing happened. John heard the voice of God confirming Jesus’ identity “This is My beloved Son, whom I love; with Him I am well pleased” (Matthew 3:17). This was witnessed by crowds of folks who had repented, and were being baptised by John (Luke 3:21-22). How thrilling the moment would have been to hear the actual voice of God, as a dove sent from heaven, landed on Jesus! Think of it – the scripture tells us this was the Holy Spirit in the form of a dove. How would that minister to the spirit of the man, Jesus? Here His Divinity was authorized, miraculously and publicly, so that people could rejoice in what God was doing. Here was God’s Son – the promised Messiah! This is heavenly validation indeed!

Jesus called a group of men to work together with Him; His intention was to train then to carry on His ministry. It was crucial that they understood what He said about Himself: “I am the Way, the Truth and the Life. No one comes to the Father but by Me” (John 14:6). No one but God could make such a claim. Thankfully Peter recognized the truth, and spoke for the others when he declared “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God!” (Matthew 16:16).

The “Truth”, which Jesus claimed to be inherently, (John 14:6), was also recognized as He hung dying, on the cross. One thief vilified Him, but the other validated Jesus when he asked Him to “remember me when You come into Your kingdom” (Luke 24:42). Oh that folks today would recognize the “Way” into the kingdom of God* , and the “Way” into heaven eventually, is through believing and receiving Jesus Christ our Lord! (John 1:12-13).

At the moment of Jesus’ death there was an earthquake, causing a Roman soldier to gasp “Surely He was the Son of God!” (Matthew 27:54). The cross was a travesty of injustice, but our Lord carried on, proving the glory of God!

Reflection:

Many people, down through the ages have questioned the veracity of Jesus’ Divinity. If He was simply a man who died, our faith is also dead. But He rose from the dead, was seen by many who validated He lives! (Acts 1:3). We do not worship a dead person but the Giver of True Life, eternal life! The question is: Does your life and mine validate the reality of Jesus Christ, as Lord?

*The kingdom of God is here in the hearts of Jesus’ followers. We do not wait to go to heaven to be blessed, but are members of His Kingdom here on earth, now! ? Because our Sovereign Lord reigns in our hearts. Praise God!

by Marilyn Daniels (MarilynDaniels.net)

Uncategorized

When God Withdraws

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Romans 1

In the Epistle to the Romans, Paul begins with some Biblical truth, in order to ground the Roman Church. He includes truths revealed in scripture about God, Himself. Now that Paul has described God’s character to us, he turns to compare it with man’s. What a disappointment humankind must be to our Creator. He gets little glory or appreciation for all that He has done for us! In fact it is quite the opposite. Man, giving in to the folly of pride, started creating his own gods. ”…their foolish hearts were darkened” (:22).

First of all man’s intellect became his god. What he thought, what he believed, what he chose to worship, became of primary importance. Where did that take him? God first gave man over to sinful desires. His thinking was infected with self-righteousness.

Second, God gave them over to shameful lusts, through which any sexual behaviour became appropriate. The heart of man became suspect, as his feelings led his head. This was not the Creator’s intention. He had revealed Himself repeatedly, through acts of mercy, through scripture, through our Lord Jesus Christ. However, Paul writes – “Although they knew God, they neither glorified Him as God nor gave thanks to Him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened” (Romans 1:21).

Third God gave them over to a depraved mind. The mind of mankind, originally created with all the potential of Godly decision-making, became filled with every kind of evil, greed and depravity resulting in a whole list of godless activities (Romans 1:29-31). Today our society, if not condoning these, will excuse murders, insolence, mistreatment of parents, hating God, in a spirit of senseless, faithless, heartless, ruthless living. The final line is drawn when they decide to approve of everyone doing such things (Romans 1:32); seen in the freedom of man’s wisdom running loose.

Note that three times Paul says “God gave them over”. Leaving man to decide his own fate, God withdrew. His character did not change. He is always, eternally, a God of love and truth and holiness. However, sin and holiness are like oil and water – they do not mix.

How is the faith community to respond? We are to love our enemies – the person, not the sin. That is very hard to do. Out of fear we want to see these evils corrected. We fear for the salvation of our loved ones, for the infection of sin which is spreading throughout society, pandemically. But we are a community of faith and our faith is put into practice by doing what Jesus would do. What would Jesus do if He walked through North America today, for example?

Is it possible to bridge the gap between right and wrong? No! Jesus already has done that with His life, and death, yet people still reject His remedy for the sickness of sin. The best we can hope for is that His joy and peace, demonstrated in a spirit of love, will create a yearning in hearts darkened by an error that is spreading like wild-fire in our hedonistic society today. We know that God has already gone to the nth degree to correct these evils, but His love is everlasting!

So we pray that the Light will still provide Life, drawing men and women out of the pit they are digging for themselves. Let us all remember at the dawn of a New Year, that positive change always begins with “me”. Furthermore, I am the only person over whom I can really have any control. With God the Holy Spirit’s help I can exercise that required control which will temper my mind and heart, and my reactions to things others do to irk me.


Reflection:

Which is the greatest sin of our day? Is one worse than another? Do we not all continue to sin in small ways or large? How dangerous is prejudice? Is this why Jesus commanded us not to judge others?

The Psalmist prayed that God would search his heart (Psalm 139:23).

Let us pray: “Create in me a new heart, O God and renew a steadfast spirit in me. Do not cast me away from Your presence, or take Your Holy Spirit from me, Restore to me the joy of Your salvation, and grant a willing spirit to sustain me.” Amen (Psalm 51:10-12).

by Marilyn Daniels (MarilynDaniels.net)

Uncategorized

Seized by Temptation!

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1 Corinthians 10:13

Do you always recognize when you have been seized by temptation? Satan is subtle. We know how Job was tempted because we read in scripture God permitted Satan to submit him to extraordinary testing. (Job 1:6-12) Everything was taken away from this wealthy man, his possessions, his family and eventually his health. God knew His man! With confidence He permitted this, with only one restriction – Satan could not take Job’s life.

David was tempted on different occasions. In a cave, hidden from his mortal enemy, David could have taken Saul’s life, but he opted to trust God with his own life and future by allowing the King to go free (1 Samuel 24). He is famous for his failure with Bathsheba, but even worse perhaps than that, was when he succumbed to the thought he should take a census throughout his nation (2 Samuel 24:1). Sometimes we ourselves confuse the voice of God with the voice of Satan. Hindsight is always clearer. As David looked back he repented, confessing his sin before God. However, there was a penalty. The consequence of his wrong choice cost 70,000 people their lives, by means of the plague (2 Samuel 24:15)

Why did the man who bravely stood before Goliath in the name of the Lord, fail to remember this Holy One was the source of his strength? Why did he need to count the strength of man-power in his army? We may never know the answer to those specific questions, but what we might learn from David’s experience is how important it is to keep our eyes fixed on God.

Seeking Him, His presence moment by moment, His will for each day, His wisdom and discernment, will give us the courage we need when Satan looks for a weakness in our armour. Knowing our weaknesses is a preventative. Do you know where and when you are most vulnerable? What do you do to prevent Satan getting a toehold in these areas? Denial is the enemy of our faith.

God promises the faithful: “No temptation has seized you except what is common to man, and God is faithful. He will not let you be tempted beyond what you are able to bear. But when you are tempted He will also provide a way out, so that you can stand up under it.”

This was true so often, in David’s case. God sent people to confront David when he sinned because God wanted him to be pure in heart. Joab, general of his army, was horrified at his suggestion to take a census and warned him of the evils (2 Samuel 24:3). Nathan confronted David regarding his sexual sin (2 Samuel 7). Eventually David was conscience-stricken and regretted bitterly the choices he had made.

Reflection:

Why did David listen to his mentors? Because he recognized he had displeased God.

Do we pause to thank God for bringing folks into our lives who have the courage to confront us so that our fellowship with God is not destroyed?

The question for us, as we face temptation today, must be “Is this pleasing to God?” Does it really matter?

by Marilyn Daniels (MarilynDaniels.net)

Devotional

Praying With Tears

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Isaiah 25:8

Recently I was reminded of something I heard many years before – that we are not sinners because we commit sinful acts, but we commit sinful acts because we are sinners. This reflects back to the truth that all have sinned and come short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23). Jesus gave us hope when He claimed those who mourned would be blessed….not speaking of grieving over a loved one’s death, but rather grieving over one’s sinful disposition. Only then do we enter into the blessings of God’s Kingdom (Matthew 5:4).

John the Baptist began the theme of repentance prior to Jesus’ ministry, after 400 years of silence from God, warning that the Kingdom of God was at hand (Matthew 3:2). Following Jesus’ ascension Peter preached the gospel of repentance, launching this foundational truth of Christianity on the Day of Pentecost (Acts 2:38). Jesus talked about repentance during His ministry, but we have some prophetic words from Him recorded by John in the Book of Revelation, when Jesus calls the seven churches to repent (Revelation 2 & 3)!

The Apostle Paul expands on the theme: “Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salvation and leaves no regret, but worldly sorrow brings death” (2 Corinthians 7:10). David knew what it meant to repent so he wrote “weeping may remain for a night, but joy comes in the morning” (Psalm 30:5). When the sincerity of our tears is assessed by God as genuine, there is an overwhelming joy in the restoration of our Father-child relationship!

Richard Foster believes that “tears are God’s way of helping us descend with the mind into the heart and there bow in perpetual adoration and worship” (Prayer, Page 41, italics mine). We really cannot worship in spirit and in truth while our hearts are separated from God by unconfessed sin. We worry about what people will think, so often try to hide our sins from those we know and love, but God knows everything. There is nowhere to hide from our eternal and infinite God (Psalm 139:7).

There might be a progression in our spiritual growth if we consider the fear of the Lord means holding Him in awe, in the deepest possible respect. Like Isaiah we might fall on our faces before this Majestic Being who is ruler of all, praying “Woe is me….my eyes have seen the King” (Isaiah 6:5). Having compared God with himself, Isaiah recognized that even as God’s prophet he was impure! As his tears fell the Lord raised him up, knowing the sincerity of his heart.

Isaiah knew a lot about tears. He wept on behalf of the obstinate, rebellious nation of Israel, but God assured him that one day, when death {separation from God] was swallowed up forever, the Sovereign Lord would wipe away all tears! What a glorious hope! (Isaiah 25:8).

Reflection:

Can you identify with the Psalmist who wrote: “My eyes shed streams of tears because Your law is not kept” (Psalm 119:136)?

Do you pray with tears over the sins of the world, or of the church, or even of your family?

Have you ever wept over your own sins? (Psalm 51:1-9)

Is your hope based on God’s promise that joy will come after tears of repentance? (Psalm 30:5)

by Marilyn Daniels

http://www.marilyndaniels.net

Devotional · Uncategorized

My Sin is Ever Before Me

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Psalm 51

In this Psalm of penitence David pleads for forgiveness and cleansing. He fears what life would be like without the presence of God. The distress causing David to pray this way is the very real understanding of how his life had failed to please God. His sin was ever in his face. Was he not forgiven?

The Bible tells us that all children of God are saints. The word “saint” comes from the Greek word hagios, which means “consecrated to God, holy, sacred, pious.” So who is a saint today? Paul talks about equipping the saints (KJV) [‘God’s people’ NIV] for works of service, for the purpose of maturing His Church (Ephesians 4:12). However the saints need prayer (Ephesians 6:18) Why?

Paul answers this question. In the passage where he addresses the equipment needed by children of God to fight the enemy of our souls (Ephesians 6:11), Paul warns the church at Ephesus to always keep on praying for the saints; in other words for one another, even for him (6:18-19a). Isn’t it comforting to know that the Holy Spirit intercedes for the saints (Romans 8:27). We also read that God guards the feet of His saints (1 Samuel 2:9).

Both Old Testament and New tell us about saints who sing God’s praises (Psalm 30:4), who love and fear the Lord. In a triumphant song of praise the Psalmist writes “The Lord takes delight in His people; He crowns the humble with salvation. Let the saints rejoice in this honour!” (Psalm 149:5). They “will receive the kingdom and will possess it forever – yes! Forever and ever” (Daniel 7:18). In the end saints will be given the privilege of judging (1 Corinthians 6:2). With all of this in mind, let’s not be deceived. Sainthood is not for a special few. Neither do we pray to saints for their support – there is nothing in scripture about that. Jesus is the one and only intercessor when we sin, with whom we share our joys and sorrows (Hebrews 7:25).

So, just as David struggled with the memory of his sin, do we also? Yes. The Apostle Paul did; he describes the struggle in Romans 6. However, there is something protective about remembering the awfulness of our sins. If we forget that taking another drink will put us over the edge, that just an innocent flirtation endangers our sexual purity, that overeating is hard on the body, that gossip ruins another’s reputation, may we not yield to temptation more easily?

Psalm 51 is a cry for mercy according to God’s unfailing love! (:1) As much as our sins impact the lives of others, it is against God alone that we have truly sinned (:4). God desires truth – and the truth is I am vulnerable to attack from within and without….but God! He is the source of wisdom and allows us to distinguish between our sinfulness and His holiness. He is the only One who can wash away all my iniquity (:2), who longs to create a new heart in each of us (:10), who saves me from guilt (:14), who knows if my repentance is genuine (:17).

Reflection:
Have you ever done anything that you hate with a passion? How did you deal with it? Are you forgiven? Do you remember it? How does that memory protect you from a repeat performance? Do you come before God with a broken spirit and a contrite heart? How does God promise to receive you in that attitude? Are you a saint or a sinner? Isn’t the answer “both”?

by Marilyn Daniels

http://www.marilyndaniels.net

Devotional · Uncategorized

Seeing Through Stained Glass

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1 Corinthians 13:8-12

Someone coined the phrase “looking at life through rose-tinted glasses”. This is described as an unduly idealistic, optimistic, sentimental, or wistful perspective on or about something. People looking through rose-tinted glasses only notice the good things about them, a view that is unrealistic. Its good to be positive in one’s outlook, but it is also important to be balanced.

The Apostle Paul was aware of mankind’s tendency to look through a glass darkly – a view through which our judgment is somewhat clouded. God gave Paul the reason why we do not see things clearly, which thankfully he recorded for our own understanding. In his first letter to the Corinthians church, Paul explains that our knowledge is only partial (:9). God who is omniscient, needs you and me to rely on His wisdom, knowledge and love. Sometimes we see in part because we don’t want to accept responsibility for things we do; as with the first people on earth, its easier to blame someone else than to accept the rebuke of a friend. “Rebuke a wise man and he will love you” (Proverbs 9:8).

It is common for us to see a poor reflection of ourselves in a mirror, rose-tinted or otherwise darkened by sin. James gives us some further insights on how to deal with this problem. When looking at oneself in a mirror there are two options. If we don’t like what we see, we can do something about it, or we can go into denial. The Holy Spirit gave James an important truth – humans have the tendency to immediately forget what they might recognize and work to improve (James 1:24). Is this wise?

God longs for us to be pure, when we claim to follow Jesus. His Word gives us the direction we need, clarifying His will for our lives. When we spend time studying the Bible we are freed, James goes on to say (1:25), and blessed by the liberty God gives to us, from the sin that so easily bests us. Once our spirits have soared into the heavenlies , let loose like a balloon floating up into the sky, who would return to the darkness of this world’s thinking and degrading behaviours?

Paul and James agree that maturity, gained through love and perseverance is the Christian’s goal…..mature in understanding God’s character, we grow to be more like Him…..mature in our understanding of what true love looks like – that amazing love of God which is more than compassionate, which is impossible without His unconditional love flowing through us.

Growing in our faith requires action on our part. He has given us the means to know Him….His Word, David said, saved him from sinning against God (Psalm 119:11). It wasn’t just reading it or hiding it in his heart, but by obeying God’s word, David was blessed. God in turn blesses us, wiping away the darkness that clouds our vision, as we persevere. Its hard to do God’s will, to be obedient but He stands ready to give us all the wisdom and knowledge required to do His will. He doesn’t leave us to flounder alone!

Reflection:

Will you accept responsibility for your own sins? How does God want you to deal with them?

Does your life and mine bring joy to the heart of God?

Have you been freed by the perfect law of God?

Do you understand what God requires of you in His perfect law? Its not complicated –

If anyone considers himself/herself religious and yet does not keep a tight rein on his/her tongue, he/she

deceives themselves and his/her religion is worthless” (James 1:26)

http://www.marilyndaniels.net

Devotional · Uncategorized

Our Covenant God

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Ezekiel 16

What is a covenant?

Ecclesiastical: A solemn agreement between the members of a church to act together in harmony with the precepts of the gospel. There are national as well as legal covenants which bind people groups together for a stated purpose.

In the Bible it is an agreement between God and His people, upon whom He places covenantal blessings, conditioned by their obedience to His laws. A covenant binds two or more parties together….for example God made a covenant between the nation of Israel and Himself.

Chapter 16 of Ezekiel’s prophecy depicts Israel as an unfaithful wife. God reviews the nation’s sin (:3-34) and describes her punishment (:35-52)….not without hope. Verses 53-63 describe the restoration of His chosen people. True to God’s character of faithful love, He honours His everlasting covenant (:60) in the end. What is the purpose of God’s covenant with Israel? That “you will know that I am the LORD” (:62), declares the Sovereign LORD (:63).

God’s Sovereignty is a cardinal doctrine of the Christian faith. In spite of things seeming to be out of control, both in Ezekiel’s day as well as our own, God is in control. It is curious to reflect on the amazing way He brings about His purposes for our world as prophecies continue to be fulfilled. It would sometimes seem that Satan is winning the battle, but we must remember he cannot win the war. We must remind ourselves of the picture painted in Job 1 & 2, where Satan comes to God for permission to test His blameless servant Job. Who is in charge? God!

God’s thoughts are not like our thoughts. They are motivated by His purity. His ways are not like our ways…they are purposeful for the ultimate good of others. (Isaiah 55:8-9) Even in the midst of His disappointment and pain, God looks beyond our fault and sees our need.

Dotty Rambo wrote a beautiful song about His outlook on each individual. It is for this reason God sent His Son to save the world from sin…in that while we were yet sinners, Christ dies for us (Romans 5:8). True to His promise God’s covenant blessing of atonement has come to us in the twenty-first century, through Jesus Christ our LORD. (Ezekiel 16:63).

Reflection:

Let us examine our reactionary style of living. What is our response when we have been hurt or disappointed?

Are we emulating God’s mercy and grace when we are angry or sad with others who let us down?

What do we learn from our covenant-keeping God?

Visit me at: http://www.marilyndaniels.net